APA Center for Organizational Excellence: Good Company

Resources for Employers

Good Company Blog

April 2014 Archives

5111995823_6d91f7e3ed_m.jpg

Flexibility in the how, when and where employees work is not just a perk for working parents – it’s smart business strategy. However, having a policy that allows employees to work remotely doesn’t always incorporate training for managers who may not know how to manage employees virtually.

How is managing employees remotely different than when they are in the office?

How do you navigate the dizzying array of tools and communication technology programs available?

How do you hold employees accountable for their work if they aren’t actually in the office?

What best practices and guidelines exist outside your organization that you could use?

These are just a few questions managers may have when their inclination is to support employees working remotely, but they may not necessarily have the skill set required to manage them. Here are a few resources, geared toward employers and managers, to get started, along with some popular business press articles that show the increasing coverage telework has been getting lately.

Our Communication Technology survey highlights the importance of helping employees manage electronic communications and the “always on” aspect of work, but most of the telework resources on our site are geared toward the employee instead of the manager. We did a little digging, though, and found some additional resources that may be helpful.

Set Up Remote Workers to Thrive

Remote Work: An Examination of Current Trends and Emerging Issues

Preparing for a new era of work

Managing a Remote Workforce: Proven Practices from Successful Leaders

Managing In a Flexible Work Environment

Books on Managing Teleworkers

Remote: Office Not Required

The Distance Manager: A Hands On Guide to Managing Off-Site Employees and Virtual Teams

Managing Telework: Strategies for Managing the Virtual Workforce

Managing the Telecommuting Employee: Set Goals, Monitor Progress, and Maximize Profit and Productivity

The Virtual Manager: Cutting-Edge Solutions for Hiring, Managing, Motivating, and Engaging Mobile Employees

Miscellaneous Resources and Popular Press Articles

A variety of resources can be found on: globalworkplaceanalytics.com

4 Things You Need to Know About Managing a Remote Team

Work From Anywhere: 4 Tips to Manage Remote Employees

How To Build (And Sustain) A Remote Workforce

Tips For Transitioning An Office-Based Company To Remote Work

4 Essential Tips for Managing Telecommuters

Bosses without borders: Essential tools for managing remote workers

What resources do you recommend that are geared towards helping management lead employees virtually? Please share by leaving a comment below or letting us know on Twitter or Facebook.

Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/loimere / CC BY 2.0

2598478591_c39f19ce62.jpg

If you have followed my blog posts on mindfulness and business so far, perhaps you have an appreciation for some of the potential the development of this skill brings to the workplace. One of the reasons mindfulness has been practiced for over 2,500 years of human history is that it has great potential to foster human growth. When something stands the test of 2,500 years of use, it has probably been beneficial.

The issue though is how to make this mindfulness skill available for the workplace in a practical way.

The first question: Is this a personal skill that should be offered to interested individuals or is it an organizational skill that would benefit groups by improving the way they work?

There are some who have seen this as a personal skill to be developed on an individual basis. Successful individuals from major companies (like Goldman Sachs and the Ford Motor Company), professional actors and politicians have touted the value of mindfulness in their success and advocated it for others within their organizations.

This approach to a mindful workplace views a mindful practice as a positive personal choice that will benefit the individual who makes the decision to develop this skill. This choice will enhance the growth and development of the individual and it will benefit the organization that employs him or her.

Mindful practices enhance the whole person, not just the work-related part of the person. When an individual chooses to develop this skill as a personal choice it can result in a more satisfying work-life balance. The expected work benefits are indirect. Better employee health can lead to better organizational outcomes. The Psychologically Healthy Workplace Award Winners have demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach many times.

Other organizations have introduced mindfulness as a workplace practice that is designed to systematically affect organizational performance. In his book Toyota Kata, Mike Rother details the approach in Toyota assembly plants to train the workforce and managers to use mindful awareness to make continuous improvement to the assembly process. Chade-Meng Tan began a program titled “Search Inside Yourself” at Google, providing mindfulness training for employees since 2007. Professional sports teams like the Seattle Seahawks and the World Championship Basketball teams of the Chicago Bulls and Los Angeles Lakers, coached by Phil Jackson, also used mindfulness practices as an integrated part of the development of excellence in their teams.

In these organizations the application of mindfulness is applied very explicitly as a systematic process that is aligned with organizational goals. If there is a process for how to use an air gun on the line at Toyota, there is also a process for how to be aware of what to address in the quality improvement process. If there is a football process for blocking, there is also a mindful practice that promotes being able to stay in the moment and not be distracted by what happened on the previous play. These applications of mindfulness to the systematic work processes that contribute to organizational goals can be made explicit.

In contrast to the approach of encouraging mindfulness as a personal choice and letting the organization benefit from the development of employees in the practice, this organizational approach focuses on developing specific attentional skills in the workplace that are clearly connected to desired outcomes. The goal is to help the company succeed. The personal benefit of mindfulness is a side effect of this approach.

The Second Question: How much training is required to acquire a skill in mindfulness that will be able to be used effectively?

The standard for teaching mindfulness practices has been an eight week training class. Each class lasts between 2 and 2 1/2 hours. Some courses include an additional 8 hour retreat about midway through the program. This format allows the participants ample time to learn and practice mindfulness skills. Most participants who are consistent in their homework of daily mindfulness practice report a significant shift at around the fifth week of the course. The mindful awareness seems more accessible and its value is more keenly felt at around that time. There has been research studies that showed brain changes that are measurable after the completion of the eight week course.

There are alternative approaches that have been used for the development of mindfulness. Two and four day retreats have been offered for executives who are interested in learning these skills. There are shorter courses (four weeks) that are available. There is even some attempt to introduce mindful practices in a self help format. These alternative approaches may be effective but have not been studied as intensely.

It should be noted that the goal of mindfulness is to practice it daily. It is not effective to set a goal of gaining knowledge about mindfulness to use on occasions when it seems appropriate but to develop a habit of mindful attention that is consistent. Mindful attention allows an individual to be able to notice important events as they occur. If it will make an impact in your workplace it must be practiced daily.

The advantage of the eight week class is that it provides participants with an experiential awareness of how regular practice is important. Shorter introductions may be effective if they lead to regular use of the skills. When the workplace becomes an environment that supports this practice, it is easier to justify a brief introduction. The Seattle Seahawks started each practice with a mindfulness exercise. Google offers regular opportunities for group practice of mindfulness. This is may be less likely to be supported in organizations that advocate mindfulness as a personal choice. Often this requires that the individual set aside time in his or her schedule to bring mindful exercises into the workday.

Tips for finding resources

If your organization is advocating mindfulness as a personal choice for employees, you might consult with your wellness program to see if they have resources to provide mindfulness training to your employees. Many universities have mindfulness training programs and some psychologists (like me) offer classes in their private clinics. If you have a number of employees who are interested in learning mindfulness you might also work out a contract for mindfulness training classes at a preferred rate for your employees.

If your organization is looking to integrate mindfulness into the core skills of your business, consider a long-term consulting contract with a mindfulness trainer or hire a mindfulness trainer for your organization. It will be essential to have onsite and regular mindfulness practice if it is going to be an effective skill that will enhance your organizational outcomes. This might include opportunities for teams to engage in a brief mindfulness exercise at specific times during the work flow.

Here are some sources of additional information and resources for helping you create a more mindful organization:

The content provided above is for informational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The inclusion of any product, service, vendor or organization does not imply endorsement, recommendation or approval by the American Psychological Association, the APA Center for Organizational Excellence or the Psychologically Healthy Workplace Program.

Photo Credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/chazoid / CC BY 2.0

Subscribe

Bookmark

  • Bookmark and Share

About this Archive

This page is an archive of entries from April 2014 listed from newest to oldest.

March 2014 is the previous archive.

May 2014 is the next archive.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.