APA Center for Organizational Excellence: Abstract Detail: Why does affect matter in organizations?

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Title

Why does affect matter in organizations?

Available Online http://www-management.wharton.upenn.edu/barsade...
Author Sigal G. Barsade & Donald E. Gibson
Source Academy of Management Perspectives
Source Type Association Publication
Summary

Focuses on a review of research involving affect in the workplace. The authors provide a basic explanation of affect as well as some of the terms used in the workplace, including emotions, moods, emotional intelligence, and emotional labor. They then review a variety of previous research studies that shows that positive emotions in the workplace are predictive of higher performance. In addition, emotions in the workplace can spread, such that positivity breeds positivity and negativity breeds negativity. Emotions also tend to influence decision making, with positive emotions often leading to riskier decision with a higher possible payoff and negative emotions often leading to safer decisions with fewer potential payoffs. Positive emotions have also been associated with higher levels of creativity, both among individuals and workgroups. In addition, the authors link affect to such outcomes as prosocial behavior, absenteeism and turnover, leadership, and negotiation.

Keywords Affect, emotions, moods, absenteeism, emotional labor, emotional intelligence, turnover, creativity, decision making, leadership, negotiation, teams
Reference

Barsade, S. G., & Gibson, D. E. (2007). Why does affect matter in organizations? Academy of Management Perspectives [online]. Retrieved May 23, 2007, from www-management.wharton.upenn.edu.

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