APA Center for Organizational Excellence: Abstract Detail: The good, the bad, and the unknown about telecommuting: Meta-analysis of psychological mediators and individual consequences

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Title

The good, the bad, and the unknown about telecommuting: Meta-analysis of psychological mediators and individual consequences

Available Online http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=main.showCo...
Publication Date November 2007
Author Ravi S. Gajendran and David A. Harrison
Source Journal of Applied Psychology
Source Type Journal Article
Summary

This article focuses on the positive and negative consequences of telecommuting, through the examination of 46 studies in natural settings. The results of meta-analyses revealed that telecommuting had small, though mostly positive effects on proximal outcomes, such as perceived autonomy and work-life conflict. In addition, telecommuting was found to have no negative effects on workplace relationships. Finally, telecommuting was found to have positive consequences for job satisfaction, performance, turnover intentions, and role stress. In addition, a primary linking mechanism between telecommuting and the distal outcomes appeared to come from autonomy.

Keywords telecommuting, distributed work, virtual work, meta-analysis
Reference

Gajendran, R. S., & Harrison, D. A. (2007). The good, the bad, and the unknown about telecommuting: Meta-analysis of psychological mediators and individual consequences. Journal of Applied Psychology, 92, 1524-1541.

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