APA Center for Organizational Excellence: Abstract Detail: Flexible and compressed workweek schedules: A meta-analysis of their effects on work-related criteria

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Title

Flexible and compressed workweek schedules: A meta-analysis of their effects on work-related criteria

Available Online http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=main.showCo...
Publication Date August 1999
Author Boris B. Baltes, Thomas E. Briggs, Joseph W. Huff, Julie A. Wright, and George A. Neuman
Source Journal of Applied Psychology
Source Type Journal Article
Summary

This article focuses on the effects of flexible work schedules and compressed workweeks on several outcomes, by providing a meta-analytic review of 31 articles. Both flextime and compressed workweeks were found to have positive impact on organizational-relevant outcomes, however, they were not equally as effective in influencing all of the outcomes. Flextime was found to be effective in increasing productivity and satisfaction, while reducing absenteeism. Compressed work weeks appear to be effective in improving supervisor ratings of performance and satisfaction. Hence, both appear to be effective work-life balance tools, but only flextime appears to reduce absenteeism.

Keywords flexible schedules, compressed work week, employee productivity, performance, job satisfaction, absenteeism, satisfaction with work schedules, scheduling
Reference

Baltes, B.B., Briggs, T.E., Huff, J.W., Wright, J.A., & Neuman, G.A. (1999). Flexible and compressed workweek schedules: A meta-analysis of their effects on work-related criteria. Journal of Applied Psychology, 84, 495-513.

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