APA Center for Organizational Excellence: Abstract Detail: Job demands, job control, and mental health in an 11-year follow-up study: Normal and reversed relationships

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Title

Job demands, job control, and mental health in an 11-year follow-up study: Normal and reversed relationships

Available Online http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content~db=all...
Publication Date October 2009
Author Dalgard, O. S., Sorensen, T., Sandanger, I., Nygard, J. F., Svensson, E., & Reas, D. L.
Source Work & Stress
Source Type Journal Article
Summary

This study provides an 11-year follow up to a study focusing on the demand-control model of stress and mental health. Results revealed that low job control had a negative effect on mental health, especially when it was coupled with high demands (i.e., high-stress jobs). Interaction effects revealed subsequently that higher levels of job control can provide a buffer from the negative effects of high job demands. Interestingly, job demands alone were not predictive of mental health.

Keywords demands-control model; mental health; reversed causal model; work-related stress
Reference

Dalgard, O. S., Sorensen, T., Sandanger, I., Nygard, J. F., Svensson, E., & Reas, D. L. (2009). Job demands, job control, and mental health in an 11-year follow-up study: Normal and reversed relationships. Work & Stress, 23, 284 – 296.

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