APA Center for Organizational Excellence: Abstract Detail: Workaholic and work engaged employees: Dead ringers or worlds apart?

Resources for Employers

Articles & Research Abstracts

Complete Reference

Title

Workaholic and work engaged employees: Dead ringers or worlds apart?

Available Online http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/ocp/16/4/468/
Publication Date October 2011
Author Ilona van Beek, Toon W. Taris, and Wilmar B. Schaufeli
Source Journal of Occupational Health Psychology
Source Type Journal Article
Summary

This article focuses on the nature, antecedents, and consequences of workaholism and work engagement. The results of a confirmatory factor analysis identified the two as independent constructs. Four types of employees were identified: workaholic employees, engaged employees, engaged workaholics, and nonworkaholic/nonengaged employees. Further analyses showed that employees who were workaholics were driven by controlled motivation, while employees who were engaged were driven by autonomous motivation. Engaged workaholics were driven by both and also spent the most time on work. Engaged workaholics did not experience the highest levels of burnout. Hence, the authors suggest that engagement may buffer the effects of workaholism on employee burnout.

Keywords workaholism, work engagement, controlled motivation, autonomous motivation
Reference

van Beek, I., Taris, T. W., & Schaufeli, W. B. (2011). Workaholic and work engaged employees: Dead ringers or worlds apart? Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 16, 468-482.

"When you have a high level of employee involvement in regards to the decision-making and problem-solving; and, when employees know that they are not alone to deal with their personal issues; and, when they see opportunities to become healthier with their employer's help; then, that business will be able to count on its greatest resource, its employees."

Glenn McFadden
Executive Vice President of Operations
The Comporium Group