APA Center for Organizational Excellence: Abstract Detail: New study shows correlation between employee engagement and the long-lost lunch break

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Title

New study shows correlation between employee engagement and the long-lost lunch break

Available Online https://www.forbes.com/sites/alankohll/2018/05/...
Publication Date May 29, 2018
Author Alan Kohll
Source Forbes
Source Type Blog
Summary

This article focuses on employees who do not take breaks throughout the workday and the negative consequences that result. The article suggests that lack of breaks throughout the day negatively affects employee well-being and the bottom line. According to a survey, North American workers believe their boss will not think they are hardworking if they take breaks, they are not encouraged to take a break, and those who do take a break are seen as less hardworking. The article discusses the research-based health, wellness and performance benefits of breaks, such as increased productivity, improved mental well-being, increased creativity, and more time for healthy habits. The article concludes by providing advice to employers to change the mentality that breaks are for slackers and to encourage all employees to take healthy breaks. The author suggests employers revamp break rooms, provide incentives for those who take breaks, discuss the benefits of breaks, and lead by example by taking breaks themselves.

Keywords Employee health and wellness, employee well-being, job burnout, employee productivity, employee lunch breaks
Reference

Kohll, A. (2018, May 29). New study shows correlation between employee engagement and the long-lost lunch break. Forbes. Retrieved June 4, 2018, from https://www.forbes.com/

"Receiving the National Psychologically Healthy Workplace Award is truly a confirmation of the many programs and services we have implemented over the years to address job-related satisfaction for our employees. We're very honored to receive this recognition."

Mark Richardson
President and CEO
Great River Health Systems